• 22 August 2013
  • 3 min read

Top 5 tips for a CV that will get you an interview

  • Matt Farrah
    Co-Founder - Nurses.co.uk, Socialcare.co.uk, Healthjobs.co.uk, Healthcarejobs.ie

Writing a CV that will get you selected for interview is a careful balance of providing enough detail to prove you’re suitably qualified, and not confusing the employer with too much information.

There are a few simple points you can follow to ensure you stick to this principle:

1 – First and foremost, you’re working in healthcare. If you’ve had other jobs prior to becoming a doctor or dentist or pharmacist or physiotherapist (etc) then you should definitely move them lower down on your CV.

While you can certainly highlight skills you gained from these jobs, they aren’t going to be specifically relevant to whether you are suitably qualified for this job.

2 – Give your registration pin number at the top of your CV alongside your contact details. It immediately validates you as a candidate able to work in your specialism in the UK.

You’d be surprised how many people forget to give this essential piece of information, and it leaves the employer trying to decide from your CV if you are actually qualified and registered or not.

3 – Make sure you cover all dates in your employment history, even if you were job-hunting after becoming qualified. Employers like to see a continuity in the dates of your activities, so lay it out really clearly for them.

Give the dates of your diploma / NVQ or degree course, any part time or bank work you did during that time, and when you started your first job as a qualified doctor / pharmacist / dentist / optician etc.

4 – If you’re newly qualified, make sure you use your placement experience as well as your course to detail the skills you have that make you a relevant candidate for the job.

Use the person specification and job description from the advert to identify the skills of the successful candidate, and draw attention to as many of them that you have achieved as possible.

If you’re more experienced then professional development achievements are very important to show. List the ones that are relevant to the job you’re applying for nearer the top of your CV, and give your other CPD (Continuing Professional Development) achievements somewhere further down.

5 – Your current job is a crucial part of your CV and is one of the first things that an employer will look at when they see your application. Make sure you give your job title in full, and preferably in bold, along with the employer’s name and your job responsibilities.

This will immediately give the employer reading your CV an idea of the level you’re working at and whether the experience from your current job will be directly applicable to the job you’ve applied for.

That’s not to say you can’t apply to work in an area that’s not similar to where you work currently, but if you’re doing that you should highlight the transferable skills you have that can be applied should be offered the job.

About the author

  • Matt Farrah
    Co-Founder - Nurses.co.uk, Socialcare.co.uk, Healthjobs.co.uk, Healthcarejobs.ie

I studied English before moving into publishing in the mid 90s. I co-founded this and our other three sites in 2008. I wanted to provide a platform that gives a voice to those working in health and social care. I'm fascinated, generally, by the career choices we all make. But I'm especially interested in the stories told by those who choose to spend their life supporting others. They are mostly positive and life-affirming stories, despite the considerable challenges and burdens faced.

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  • Matt Farrah
    Co-Founder - Nurses.co.uk, Socialcare.co.uk, Healthjobs.co.uk, Healthcarejobs.ie

About the author

  • Matt Farrah
    Co-Founder - Nurses.co.uk, Socialcare.co.uk, Healthjobs.co.uk, Healthcarejobs.ie

I studied English before moving into publishing in the mid 90s. I co-founded this and our other three sites in 2008. I wanted to provide a platform that gives a voice to those working in health and social care. I'm fascinated, generally, by the career choices we all make. But I'm especially interested in the stories told by those who choose to spend their life supporting others. They are mostly positive and life-affirming stories, despite the considerable challenges and burdens faced.

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